Why don't we have high-speed rail already?

It’s not because America is “too big.” Most of our country, from small towns to big cities, was actually built around train travel!

We just forgot about trains. We stopped investing in them.

We need to rebalance our nation’s transportation systems—and recover our competitive advantage—by making fast, frequent trains an everyday option for travel across the U.S.

This isn’t science fiction. The U.S. already has something that’s almost high-speed rail—and it’s a smashing success.

Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor is a publicly-owned, urban trunk line stretching from Washington, D.C., to Boston. In the competition for riders in this heavily traveled corridor, Amtrak trains easily beat planes.

From July 2017 to June 2018, for example, Amtrak carried three times more riders between D.C. and New York City than all the airlines combined.

Of course, the Northeast isn’t the only place suited to fast trains. There are regions and corridors once connected by trains all across the country. We can reconnect them at 220 mph, linking small- and mid-sized communities to each other and to major urban centers—and opening up new work and educational opportunities to everyone.